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endorsement

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure how much a person believes individuals within a particular group of people or other entities are viewed as being much the same, especially when one endorser can be easily replaced by another.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure how much a person believes that some customers have endorsed an agent because they sincerely think he/she is worth it.

A person’s confidence in a brand that has been endorsed by a particular celebrity and willingness to buy the product is measured with three, six-point Likert-type items.

With eight, seven-point semantic differentials, the scale measures various socially-related characteristics of a person, with an emphasis on how pro- or anti-social the individual is viewed as being.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a person’s interest and willingness to spread information about a particular product review to his/her Twitter followers.  Another aspect mentioned in two of the items is the name of the person, potentially a celebrity, who endorsed the product.

A five-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which an endorser is viewed as being knowledgeable about a topic.

This scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type statements intended to measure a person's opinion of an endorser's honesty and dependability.

This three-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is intended to measure a person's opinion of a product endorser's physical attractiveness.

A four-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the extent to which a person believes a party that has evaluated and endorsed a new product is viewed favorably by others. The measure was referred to as superordinate group influence by Fisher and Price (1992).

Three semantic differentials are used to measure the extent of perceived compatibility between the endorser of a product in an advertisement and the brand being featured. With a different scale stem or instructions, the items seem to be amenable for measuring other types of fit, e.g., merger of two companies, a company's sponsorship of a particular event/cause, co-branding of products, etc.