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fluency

The clarity with which a person has a picture in his/her mind of a particular object or event is measured with three, seven-point items.

With five, seven-point bi-polar adjectives, the scale measures the degree of ease or difficulty with which a person is able to mentally process some information.

The pleasantness and ease felt when performing an activity is measured with four, seven-point semantic-differentials.  The scale is particularly appropriate when the context involves real or imagined haptic cues.

Six, nine-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person is easily able to imagine how furniture would look in a dwelling (house or apartment).

The scale uses seven items to measure how much a person believes that a particular typeface is uncommon and difficult to read.  Responses to the items are made with a seven-point Likert-type scale.

With four Likert-type statements, the scale measures how easy a consumer believes it was to compare the healthiness of some similar products by using the information available on their packages.

Six, seven-point semantic differentials measure the ease with which some particular written information was read and processed.  

The ease with which a consumer can determine the healthiness of a food product from information provided on its package is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a person reports being able to “see” in his/her mind a particular object or action is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Four questions with seven-point semantic differential responses are used to measure how well written and easy-to-understand an article was.  One of the items refers to “arguments,” referring to reasons for or against something.  Given that, the scale makes most sense to use when respondents have been exposed to information that was intended to affect their attitudes.