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scarcity

Five, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a person believes people in the world, and one’s self in particular, have experienced not having enough resources.

With four, seven-point items, the scale measures how much a person believes he/she has not had enough “resources” in the past and may not have enough in the future.  The types of resources are not stated in the items but should be made clear to participants in the instructions and/or the context of the experiment.

Three, seven-point items measure a person’s belief regarding the degree to which the family had enough money to pay for food and housing when he/she was growing up.

The rarity and scarcity of an object, such as a product, is measured in this scale with three, nine-point Likert-type items.

Three questions with seven-point response alternatives measure the extent to which a person believes a particular person is sought after in the job market.

Three, nine-point items are used to measure the likelihood that a particular product or brand will be in short supply.  The timeframe is not stated in the items themselves but could be easily stated in the instructions.

The degree to which a person believes that his/her resources are insufficient and that more are needed is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.  The items themselves are rather general.  Focusing participants’ attention on a particular situation and type of resource would need to be done in the context of the study or the questionnaire’s instructions.

The scale uses five, seven-point items to measure how much a person feels at a particular moment that he/she is unrushed and that time is in abundance.

The scale measures a consumer's perceived likelihood that a certain product will not be available when he/she wants it.  Four, six-point Likert-type items are used to measure the construct.

The extent to which a consumer believes that a particular product or brand is in short supply due to unintentional order problems or greater demand than expected is measured using a three-item, seven-point Likert-type scale.