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willingness

Seven, seven-point items measure how willing a person is to engage in relationships with people who have a mental illness.

Four statements measure a person’s belief that when posting information on social media, he/she is more revealing and less restrained about expressing thoughts and feelings. 

The three, seven-point Likert-type items in this scale measure the degree to which a person who has visited a place (unidentified in the items) is willing to visit it again if the same level of service is provided.  The scale appears to be amenable for use with hotels, restaurants, resorts, and a wide variety of other places people visit that provide some degree of service and which can affect one’s intention of returning to in the future.

A customer’s openness to contacting and interacting with a salesperson in the future whom he/she has interacted with in the past is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items. 

How willing a person is to take risks with his/her financial investment activity is measured with five, five-point items.

How much a person expresses willingness and likelihood of recycling is measured with three, seven-point items.

A person’s expressed likelihood of giving money to a particular charity is measured using three, seven-point items.  Donating money is explicitly mentioned in the items but contributing other material or non-material resources are not mentioned.

The subjective probability expressed by a consumer that indicates he/she would buy a particular product at its present price is measured with five, seven-point items.

With three, nine-point items, the scale is intended to measure a person’s opinion about how willing a company would be to listen to a customer’s request and agree to it.  The underlying tone of the sentences, which can be made more explicit by the study’s context, is that the request is unusual or against the rules.

The extent to which a consumer expresses an inclination to purchase a particular product is measured in this scale with three, nine-point semantic differentials.