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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

advertising

The scale is composed of six items meant to measure a person’s motivation to process
information from an advertisement at the time of brand choice.

The extent to which a person perceives an object to be tangible and realistic-looking is measured with three, uni-polar items.

The extent to which a person feels that an object is close to one’s self rather than far away is measured using four, seven-point items.

The scale measures the extent to which a visual pattern, such as in a print advertisement, is interpreted as indicating motion, particularly forward movement.  Four, seven-point semantic differential phrases compose the scale.

The extent to which a person feels astonishment and wonder after viewing an advertisement is measured with three, seven-point items.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s willingness to have advertisements by a social media platform such as Facebook target him/her based on information from another company’s website.

The six, seven-point Likert-type items in this scale are intended to measure a person’s willingness to have personalized advertisements targeted at him/her by a social media platform based on demographic inferences from his/her usage of the website.

Using five, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s willingness to have a social media platform such as Facebook target advertisements at him/her based on information provided by the person in his/her profile.

The scale uses seven, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a person’s willingness to have advertisements targeted at him/her by a social media platform such as Facebook that are based on information gathered from the person’s behavior at the website.

Three, four-point Likert-type sentences measure how much a person believes, in general, that advertising is believable and a good source of information.