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Testimonial

Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

advertising

The scale uses seven, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a person’s belief that an advertisement misleads people with its claims and implications about a particular product’s environmentally-related attributes.

This scale has seven, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person was engaged in the “flow” of an advertisement and felt better because of it.

With three, seven-point semantic differentials, the scale measures how large or small an object is perceived to be.  The scale is considered general because it appears like it could be used for evaluating a wide variety of stimuli.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how much a person believes that a particular object looks complex.   

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s usage of two media at the same time to perform one or more tasks.  To be clear, the scale focuses on what a person did in a particular situation rather than his/her tendency over time to multi-task.

How much a person believes that an advertising message explains why customers should participate in an activity is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes an advertising message stresses how customers can participate in an activity.

Using three, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the extent to which a person believes a certain advertisement provides accurate information.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used in this scale to measure a person’s judgement of whether an advertisement emphasized benefits gained by the person taking an action or the losses and costs if the action was not taken. 

The degree to which a person has been persuaded by an advertisement to engage in behaviors that support of a particular cause is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.