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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

advertising

To measure a person's global attitude toward advertising, the scale uses three, five-point Likert-type items.  The statements are not specific to any particular type of advertising, facet, or context but instead apply to advertising overall.

This three item, Likert-type scale measures how well a person believes the advertisement for a certain product is suited for that product. 

The extent to which a person, such as a viewer or consumer, believes that he/she is similar to the person who created a particular ad is measured using three, seven-point items.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure the degree to which a person was thinking about the immediate health-related consequences of using the product featured in the ad he/she was watching.

The scale has three, seven-point items that measure the extent to which a person reports that he/she was thinking about the long-term health-related consequences of using the product featured in an ad just watched.

The degree to which a person believes that a certain brand-related marketing strategy is commonly used among competitors in a certain product category is measured with five, nine-point semantic differentials.  The scale appears to be amenable for use with a variety of brand-related strategies.

The level of exactitude a person believes was used in a particular advertising claim is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

A person's belief that an advertiser created a particular ad and aimed it at people like him/her is measured with three items.

How much a person believes a particular message is worded normally rather than being phrased in an unusual way is measured using three items. Although Kronrod, Grinstein, and Wathieu (2012) used the scale with respect to an ad-type message, the items are amenable for use with other types of messages. 

Three, five-point uni-polar items are used to measure which of two ads a person has been exposed to is viewed as more boring.