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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

advertising

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a particular advertisement is visually appealing.

Composed of three very simple, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale is purported to measure the degree to which a person views a particular advertisement as being energetic and “alive” in a visual sense.

Three statements with a nine-point response format are used to measure how important and meaningful a slogan is to a person.

Five, nine-point semantic differentials are used in this scale to measure how much a person believes that a message was persuasive and changed what he/she thought about a topic.

With six, nine-point bi-polar adjectives, the scale measures the degree to which an object appears to be unusual and unexpected.  Given the multiple facets of the construct represented in the items and depending on the way the items are scored, the scale could be considered a measure of similarity, typicality, or novelty.  The scale is general in the sense that it could be used with a variety of objects and in a variety of contexts.  

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used measure the degree to which a person reports that an ad made him/her feel exposed and unsafe.

The degree to which a person believes that an ad is exciting and energetic is measured with four, seven-point semantic differentials.

The scale uses four statements to measure whether a person believes that an ad was deliberately personalized for his/her situation.  To be clear, the scale does not measure if someone liked/disliked the personalization but rather if some degree of personalization was noted in the ad.

Seven, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s belief about how favorably “other people” would think a group of people were portrayed in an ad.

A consumer’s interest in a brand that results from exposure to an ad is measured with five, seven-point items.  The interest referred to in the items ranges from learning more about the product to planning to buy it.