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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

affect

Composed of three, seven-point items, the scale measures how much a person believes that the current day's weather is making him/her and other people feel good.

How much a person reports feeling emotions related to disappointment and discouragement at some point or period of time is measured with four, seven-point uni-polar items.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a consumer feels that a particular brand stimulates feelings of being in nature and/or close to it.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person’s expectation that if a particular refund was received, he/she would feel good.

With five, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person believes that thinking about his/her discretionary purchases would result in various negative feelings. 

How kind and friendly something appears to be is measured with seven-point items.  Three similar versions are described and, depending upon the version, the scales seem to be flexible for use with a variety of objects such as people, animals, and brands.

Using five, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a product conveys the presence of a human being, with an emphasis on social and affective attributes.

With six, seven-point Likert-type items the scale measures a person’s ability to recover from stressful events that are experienced.

With six, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the level of emotional discomfort that was experienced when a stimulus evoked thoughts about one’s morality.

This scale has seven, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person was engaged in the “flow” of an advertisement and felt better because of it.