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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensable in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

altruism

With five, seven-point items, the scale measures how much a person feels happy and proud after having made an altruistic-related choice.

How much a person is experiencing positive affect as a result of having done something considered to be good, helpful, and/or caring is measured with four, seven-point items.

Composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person’s reason for providing a product review to others was a sincere concern to help them make better decisions.  The items are general enough for use with regard to posting product reviews online or privately sharing opinions with friends. 

The degree to which a person believes that a particular organization cares about its customers and is helpful is measured with this five-point scale.  A two and a four item version are discussed.  While the scale was made for use in the hospitality industry, it could be easily used with many other businesses as well.  With a minor change in one of the items, the scale could be used with non-businesses as well.

The level of care, concern, and helpfulness exhibited by a company to its customers is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

Twelve, seven-point, uni-polar items are used to describe how much a person’s moral character is characterized by traits such as altruism, sincerity, and purity.

How much a person views another person as generous and caring is measured in this scale with four unipolar items.  Application of this scale to measuring the altruism of entities other than individual persons seems possible.

Three semantic differentials are used to measure how cooperative and kind a person is.  As used by Fisher and Ma (2014), the judgement is made regarding someone else rather than oneself.

Four, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to assess the extent to which a person thinks that the support provided by a particular business organization to a charity is done to benefit itself rather than being motivated by altruism. The scale was called anti-altruism by Dean (2002).

The four item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures the degree to which a consumer believes that the support provided by a particular business organization to a charity is generous and unselfish.