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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

anthropomorphism

How much a particular device or app evoked a person's sense of being with another person is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

How much a consumer views a particular brand as having the human-like quality of being helpful, particularly in terms of assisting the person in being different is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

This scale measures how much a person considers an object to be a machine rather than a human and can be easily replaced because of that.  Ten, seven-point Likert-type items compose the scale.

Using five, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a product conveys the presence of a human being, with an emphasis on social and affective attributes.

With three items, this scale measures a consumer’s belief that a brand expresses interest in being part of one’s life.

This three-item scale measures the belief that a brand is attempting to build a sense of closeness between itself and the consumer (the respondent).

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person attributes thought and emotion to a logo regarding its helplessness and not being in control.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a logo appears to move as if it is alive.

The general tendency to attribute distinct human mental capacities to nonhumans is measured with 15 questions.

A person’s attribution of humanlike qualities to time (free will, emotions, intentions) is measured using six, seven-point items.