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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

anxiety

Five, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree of anxiety and worry felt primarily because of the unpredictable events in one’s environment. (While this scale is not measuring stress due to the changing status of the natural environment per se, its perceived degradation could be one of the causes of overall stress along with other external stressors.)

This scale uses five, seven-point uni-polar items to measure how much a person feels nervous and afraid.

Usage of one’s phone to help relieve stress and deal with other uncomfortable situations is measured in this scale with four, seven-point Likert-like items.

Composed of four, seven-point uni-polar items, the scale measures how much a person feels tense and uneasy at some point or period of time.

How much a person reports feeling emotions related to disappointment and discouragement at some point or period of time is measured with four, seven-point uni-polar items.

At the current time, how much a person experiences and expresses emotions related to anxiety is measured with five, five-point items. 

The extent to which a person currently feels anxious and nervous rather than calm and relaxed is measured with eight, seven-point uni-polar items.

The extent to which a person desires to be close to a partner in a romantic relationship and worries about being abandoned is measured with a seven-point Likert-type format.  A four-item and a six-item version are described.

The scale measures a person’s anxiety that is based on some sort of a physical restriction being experienced.  Two versions of the scale are described that are slightly different in the number of items and the response scales used with them.

With six, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the level of emotional discomfort that was experienced when a stimulus evoked thoughts about one’s morality.