You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensable in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

appearance

The degree of importance a person places on being skinny and attractive is measured with three, seven-point items.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a person’s overall attitude toward a particular color (unspecified in the sentences themselves).

Five semantic differentials compose the scale and measure facets of a food product’s quality and taste.

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person attributes thought and emotion to a logo regarding its helplessness and not being in control.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a logo appears to move as if it is alive.

How much a person likes a product’s quality as well as the way it looks is measured with three, five-point items.  The scale is “general” in the sense that it can be easily customized for use with a wide variety of objects. 

The scale uses three, ten-point questions to measure the degree to which a person thought about how he/she looked compared to a particular person with whom he/she interacted. 

The extent to which a person views a non-human object as being like a person, with an emphasis on its assumed mental abilities, is measured with six, seven-point items.

How much a person believes that a particular set of employees share a common physical appearance is measured with three items.  The statements are phrased generally and do not specify what attributes appear to be similar.

How much a person likes a beverage based on the way it looks and tastes is measured with four, seven-point items.