You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

This website has truly been a welcome gift! The Day Pass is extremely affordable & the site is so user friendly to navigate. It provides a wealth of information including, the source, validity, & references for my doctorate research project. I highly recommend this to anyone as it is truly an invaluable research tool!
Suzanne Cromlish, PhD
Saint Xavier University, Chicago

appropriateness

A seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure how much a person believes or “feels” that a particular object in an ad appears it be moving in the appropriate direction.   Both a four-item and a three-item version are described.

The degree to which a person believes there are clear social norms that people should comply with in his/her country is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how much a person believes there are clear social norms and that he/she should comply with them.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s (the recommender’s) beliefs regarding the potential negative social consequences of recommending a person who could view it as inappropriate.  The sentences are flexible for use with a variety of contexts but may make the most sense with regard to customer referral reward programs. 

This scale has four, seven-point uni-polar items that measure how acceptable and proper an object or activity seems to be.  The measure is general in the sense that, with the right instructions, the items are amenable for use in a wide variety of situations.

This very simple three-item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures a person’s attitude about the price of a particular good or service with the emphasis on its acceptability.

The degree to which a sponsoring entity and a sponsee are viewed as fitting together well is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.  (A sponsee is the entity being sponsored, such as an event, an organization, or a cause.)

The degree to which a person believes that something is inappropriate and scandalous is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person believes that a company uses his/her customer information in an ethical manner.

Nine items are used to measure the tendency to accept one’s thoughts and feelings as they occur without evaluation or self-criticism.