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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensable in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

association

The link between two of one’s self-identities is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.  The particular identities referred to in the sentences are ideal and ought.  

This Likert-type scale measures how much a consumer believes that two products that have been promoted together are associated because they are used together by consumers.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure how much a person visually imagined shopping in a store as well as picturing possible sets of associated products that could be used together.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a person believes a collective of entities such as people or companies have unity and coherence rather than just an aggregate of individuals.

How much a person views a collective of individual entities such as people or companies as a social group is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes an object or experience is closely associated with his/her identity.

The scale uses four, seven-point items to measure how much a person has the desire to be around and in touch with things from “home,” however he/she defines it.

The extent to which a consumer believes there is a strong, positive connection between the price of something and its quality is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale measures the extent to which a person feels the need to be accepted by others and to have them to turn to for help.

How much an object is worth to a person is measured in this scale with three items.  Although the scale might be used for other purposes, it makes the most sense when used with an object that has been owned or associated with someone who could be viewed by the respondent as a "celebrity."  Even if that person is not liked, the association may lead to the object being valued more by the respondent than it otherwise would have been.