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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

attention

The degree to which a person focused his/her attention on something specific (stated in the items) is measured with three questions and a ten-point response scale.

The scale measures how much a person reports having a difficult time focusing on a shopping task.  The measure has five, seven-point Likert-type items.

How much a shopper felt unable to focus during a particular shopping trip due to interruptions is measured with four items.

The degree to which a participant in an experimental task reports being unable to concentrate and focus is measured with seven, ten-point Likert-type items.

Four items measure how much a consumer believes that a particular product he/she purchased was not identifiable to others nor did it draw attention.  For the scale to make sense, it probably should be used with respect to a retail store in which one’s shopping activity could be witnessed by others.

How much effort a participant put into a study and how interesting he/she considered it to be is measured with four, seven-point items.

This three-item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures the degree to which a person believes that having to take photos with a particular purpose in mind negatively impacted the personal experience of what was being photographed. The goal of taking the photos is not named in the items but can be provided in the instructions if it is not obvious from the context.

How much a person attentively watched a television program and considered it to be fascinating is measured in the scale with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Using five, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s emotional involvement in an advertisement.

With four, five-point items, the Likert scale measures how actively a person thought about an object and, in particular, how useful he/she believed it could be.