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The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

attitudes

Three, seven-point items measure how much a person cares about a particular decision and is involved in it.  As phrased, the decision is in the future.  The items can be easily adapted for reference to a decision that has already been made.

The belief that a company’s founders are intent on working hard and persistently to overcome obstacles to their success is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The extent to which a person feels that an object is close to one’s self rather than far away is measured using four, seven-point items.

How much a person believes his/her personal actions can help end a behavior that is viewed negatively is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.  The items are amenable for use in a variety of situations where a particular behavior is viewed as inappropriate and the person is not alone in believing it.

Using three, nine-point items, the scale measures how well a set of salespeople are believed to be working as a unit and united in their efforts.

With four, seven-point items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes his/her initial experience with a product to have been a one-time event and not representative of the product in general.

The degree to which a person believes the source of some information, probably another person, is pushy and aggressive is measured with three, nine-point bipolar items.

The degree to which a patient believes that the person or device making a recommendation about a medical procedure would not give consideration to his/her unique condition and circumstances is measured with three, seven-point items.

How much a customer believes that multiple brand-owned touchpoints are responsive and adaptive to his/her specific needs, circumstances, and activities is measured using four Likert-type items.

With four Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a consumer considers multiple touchpoints as sharing a common brand theme.