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Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

attitudes

Four, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure one's belief that he/she was being observed in a particular situation.

Using three, seven-point items, the scale measures the extent to which a person believes the rivalry between two teams is intensified because of the game in which they are pitted against each other.  The scale is most suitable for sporting events which have two teams playing against each other or when the researcher’s desire is to focus participants’ attention on two of several teams in a multi-team event such as the Olympics.

The rarity and scarcity of an object, such as a product, is measured in this scale with three, nine-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a person describes a person as having traits stereotypically associated with females is measured in this scale with three, five-point unipolar items.

The scale uses three, five-point unipolar items to measure how much a person describes someone as having traits stereotypically associated with males.

Four, seven-point items measure how much a person believes that a particular food is good to eat and is not fattening.

With four, nine-point items, the scale measures a person’s belief that joining a particular fitness club will help reduce health risks.

The ease with which a consumer can determine the healthiness of a food product from information provided on its package is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has eight, seven-point Likert-type items that are intended to measure a person's belief in either the stability of body type (entity theory) or their ability to change basic body characteristics (incremental theory).  To be clear, beliefs about the nature of human bodies in general are measured by this scale rather than what people think about a particular person’s body.

A person’s general attitude about a logo is measured with three, five-point semantic differentials.