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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

attitudes

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures how appetizing and satisfying a person considers a food or beverage to have been that was tasted.  The scale is general in the sense that it is an overall measure rather than assessing a particular type of taste such as sweet, salty, spicy, etc.

Four, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure the degree to which an object has a texture that feels comfortable and gentle against the skin.

Seven, five-point items are used to measure the degree to which a person has a type of cognition in which reality is viewed in terms of polar opposites rather than a continuum.  An eight-item version of the scale is also described.

The scale has three, nine-point items that measure how much a company’s ratings are as expected compared to those of other companies. 

One’s belief that he/she has value because of the love that comes from GOD is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

Six items are used to measure the belief that a particular salesperson engaged in questioning and answering in an attempt to convince one that he/she (the consumer) would benefit from a suggested product solution.

The scale has six items that measure the degree to which a consumer believes a particular salesperson with whom he/she has interacted tried to build a rapport and an emotional connection between them prior to or along with discussion of sales issues.

Using six items, the scale measures the belief that a particular salesperson with whom a consumer interacted used compliance tactics based on immediate, superficial factors (threats and promises) not directly related to the product itself.

The scale measures how much an app helps a person feel more confident about pursuing a particular set of goals.  Three, nine-point items compose the scale.

The scale measures the degree to which a person’s motivation with regard to self-improvement is more about accomplishing a goal rather than the activities performed to reach it.  Five, nine-point Likert-type items compose the scale.