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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensable in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

attitudes

The ease of understanding and using a branded mobile phone application is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure the extent to which a person believes that one’s credit card app safely stores and uploads information.

The extent to which a person feels a sense of personal control in a particular situation is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

How much a customer believes that a particular product is not worth the price being charged is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

How much a consumer has positive beliefs about the multiple products that share the same particular brand name is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which one considers self to be fashionable and thinks others admire his/her stylishness is measured with three, five-point Likert items.

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures how appetizing and satisfying a person considers a food or beverage to have been that was tasted.  The scale is general in the sense that it is an overall measure rather than assessing a particular type of taste such as sweet, salty, spicy, etc.

Four, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure the degree to which an object has a texture that feels comfortable and gentle against the skin.

Seven, five-point items are used to measure the degree to which a person has a type of cognition in which reality is viewed in terms of polar opposites rather than a continuum.  An eight-item version of the scale is also described.

The scale has three, nine-point items that measure how much a company’s ratings are as expected compared to those of other companies.