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Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

attitudes

Three, three-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which one believes that donating time to an organization benefits the community and is appreciated. The measure was referred to as benefit to the community by Yavas and Riecken (1985).

This five-item, six-point, Likert-type scale measures a consumer's attitude about shopping at local stores. It was referred to as negative attitude toward local shopping by Hawes and Lumpkin (1984) because items were scored such that higher scores implied more negative attitudes.

This three-item, seven-point semantic differential rating scale is used to measure the degree of importance a person places on a purchase decision for some product and the amount of attention devoted to it.

Five, five-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which a customer perceives a salesperson to have greater interest in self than in the customer. Williams and Spiro (1985) viewed this scale as measuring the self-oriented dimension of customer communication style, which stresses a lack of empathy and interest in self more than others.

This three-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a consumer perceives a transaction was fair, particularly in relation to the treatment received from the salesperson handling the transaction.

This is a three-item, three-point Likert-type scale measuring one's attitude about donating time to a community organization. The measure was referred to as willingness to donate by Yavas and Riecken (1985).

A three-item, seven-point semantic differential scale is used to measure the perceived "activity" of a stimulus.