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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

attitudes

The scale has three, seven-point Likert items that measure how much a person expected to feel good if he/she scored many points in a game.

With four Likert-type statements, the scale measures how easy a consumer believes it was to compare the healthiness of some similar products by using the information available on their packages.

The efficacy and likelihood that a “treatment” will cure a “condition” are measured with five, nine-point questions.  The particular treatment and condition are specified in the items.

Five, nine-point Likert-type items compose the scale and measure a person’s confidence that one will successfully manage his/her health by engaging in a certain activity.  (The activity can be specified by the researcher.)

With three, 101-point items, the purpose of the scale is to measure how far into the future a certain health problem is believed to be.

The extent to which a person believes that he/she was able to control the level of privacy experienced in a particular situation is measured using four, seven-point, Likert-type items.

In this scale, four, seven-point semantic differentials evaluate how positive or negative a person’s attitude is toward a brand name.  A three-item version is also described.

With three items, this scale measures a consumer’s belief that a brand expresses interest in being part of one’s life.

This three-item scale measures the belief that a brand is attempting to build a sense of closeness between itself and the consumer (the respondent).

A customer’s belief that something such as a particular brand or company is better than the alternatives and that he/she is loyal to it, is measured using three, nine-point Likert-type items.