You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

attitudes

In this scale, four, seven-point semantic differentials evaluate how positive or negative a person’s attitude is toward a brand name.  A three-item version is also described.

With three items, this scale measures a consumer’s belief that a brand expresses interest in being part of one’s life.

This three-item scale measures the belief that a brand is attempting to build a sense of closeness between itself and the consumer (the respondent).

A customer’s belief that something such as a particular brand or company is better than the alternatives and that he/she is loyal to it, is measured using three, nine-point Likert-type items.

Eight, seven-point Likert-type items measure a consumer’s belief that a particular company engages in behaviors that are thought to advance social good such as caring for people and the environment.

The degree to which a person believes that a particular company raises its prices to compensate for the expense of supporting “good” causes is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale does not measure whether or not the person agrees with the markup but just that it is occurring because of the company’s benevolent activity.

With four, five-point items, the scale measures an adolescent’s belief that his/her parents would care about he/she thought if they said some media content is unsuitable for children, e.g., there is too much violence in movies and video games.

With three, nine-point items, the scale measures how much time and thought a person believes another person put into writing a product review.

With four, nine-point items, the scale measures the extent to which a person believes that one or more employees of a company engaged in improper activity that deceived and harmed clients.  WARNING: The article in which this scale was reported has been retracted by the second author due to anomilies in the data and analyses [Journal of Consumer Research (2020), 47 (4), 632]. The extent to which the anomilies affected this scale is unknown.

Four, nine-point items compose the scale which measures the extent to which a person believes an employee of a company has done something that is either immoral and damaging to his/her company or, at the other extreme, was honest and helpful.  WARNING: The article in which this scale was reported has been retracted by the second author due to anomilies in the data and analyses [Journal of Consumer Research (2020), 47 (4), 632]. The extent to which the anomilies affected this scale is unknown.