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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensable in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

attitudes

With three, nine-point items, the scale measures how much time and thought a person believes another person put into writing a product review.

With four, nine-point items, the scale measures the extent to which a person believes that one or more employees of a company engaged in improper activity that deceived and harmed clients.  WARNING: The article in which this scale was reported has been retracted by the second author due to anomilies in the data and analyses [Journal of Consumer Research (2020), 47 (4), 632]. The extent to which the anomilies affected this scale is unknown.

Four, nine-point items compose the scale which measures the extent to which a person believes an employee of a company has done something that is either immoral and damaging to his/her company or, at the other extreme, was honest and helpful.  WARNING: The article in which this scale was reported has been retracted by the second author due to anomilies in the data and analyses [Journal of Consumer Research (2020), 47 (4), 632]. The extent to which the anomilies affected this scale is unknown.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how easy and understandable a person believes a particular in-store shopping technology would be to use.  As currently phrased, the items are stated hypothetically because the respondent has only read about the technology.  The sentences could be easily changed to measure a shopper’s actual experience with the technology.

A person’s confidence in his/her ability to accomplish financial goals is measured with seven Likert items.

The degree to which a sponsoring entity and a sponsee are viewed as fitting together well is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.  (A sponsee is the entity being sponsored, such as an event, an organization, or a cause.)

This Likert scale measures the degree to which a customer of a store believes an employee was unfriendly based upon several verbal and non-verbal behaviors observed during a visit.  Items for both a nine-item and a three-item version are described.

Four, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure one's belief that he/she was being observed in a particular situation.

Using three, seven-point items, the scale measures the extent to which a person believes the rivalry between two teams is intensified because of the game in which they are pitted against each other.  The scale is most suitable for sporting events which have two teams playing against each other or when the researcher’s desire is to focus participants’ attention on two of several teams in a multi-team event such as the Olympics.

The rarity and scarcity of an object, such as a product, is measured in this scale with three, nine-point Likert-type items.