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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

attitudes

A six-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person who has just gone through an experience with other people describes feeling closer to them because of the events and activities they shared. Arnould and Price (1993) referred to the construct measured as communitas.

A seven-point Likert-like scale is used to measure a person's beliefs regarding a particular brand of audio player. Muehling, Laczniak, and Stoltman (1991) referred to this measure as cognitive structure index and used it to examine a fictitious brand of cassette player.

The three-item, seven-point scale attempts to assess a person's stated likelihood of getting a diagnostic blood test in the future.

This four-item, eight-point scale is used to measure a consumer's attitude toward some new product concept.

A seven-item, seven-point semantic differential is used to measure a consumer's evaluation of a product in mostly utilitarian terms.

A four-item, seven-point semantic differential scale is used to measure how a person feels about attempting to lose weight during the upcoming week.

A four-item, seven-point semantic differential scale is used to measure the value-related aspects of a consumer's attitude toward some specific product.

A four-item, five-point summated ratings scale is used to measure the attitude and intention one has toward a specific brand of beer compared with the brand the person drinks most often.

A nine-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure a person's attitude toward some specified country.

A four-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person who has filled out a questionnaire believes his/her responses will remain anonymous.