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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensable in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

attitudes

The scale is composed of three items with seven-point response formats that measure a person's attitude regarding a store's prices, with some emphasis on how they compare to other stores.

Three unipolar items with a seven-point response format are used to measure the degree to which a person describes something as having a quality that indicates a lack of power and authority.

This five-item, seven-point scale is intended to measure the degree to which a person describes another person as having skills and/or expertise on a topic. The person being described in the study by Comer (1984) was sales manager while in the study by Dellande, Gilly, and Graham (2004) the person was a weight loss counselor.

Three, nine-point bi-polar adjectives are used to measure the extent to which a person believes a certain result has been achieved.

A six item, seven point semantic differential scale is used to measure a person's beliefs concerning the time and effort involved in a specified method of placing an order. As described below, the setting used by Dabholkar (1994) was ordering at a fast-food restaurant and two options were compared: touch screen ordering versus verbally placing the order with an employee.

Three, nine-point statements are used to measure the extent to which a consumer believes that the advertised new features of a product provide additional benefits and value to the product.

A person's belief that his/her repeated experience has shown that buying from a certain company is better than buying from others is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items. The scale was called conative loyalty by Harris and Goode (2004) and was used with respect to online stores but it appears to be amenable for use with a variety of vendors.

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type statements that are intended to measure the extent to which a person likes a certain company along with its features, services, and offerings. The scale was called affective loyalty by Harris and Goode (2004) and was used with respect to online stores but it appears to be amenable for use with a variety of vendors.

Four, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to measure a person's belief that buying from a certain company is preferable to buying from others. The scale was called cognitive loyalty by Harris and Goode (2004) and was used with respect to online stores but it appears to be amenable for use with a variety of vendors.

The scale is composed of three statements measuring the extent to which a person believes a decision that has been made makes sense and is easy to support.