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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

attitudes

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type statements and measures a person's reasons for using the Internet with an emphasis on the ease with which it can be used.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure the degree to which a person uses the Internet because of the enjoyment received from it and its usefulness in having a good time.

The three-item, seven-point scale measures the extent to which a person thinks that Internet stores are easier to shop at and save more time compared to shopping at traditional retail stores. The scale is attempting to tap into a general attitude, not specific to any particular website or store.

This three item scale is intended to measure the extent to which a person imagines that an object connects him/her to another time/place.

The scale is composed of three Likert-type statements that measure the strength with which a person identifies with a certain role they either play or might play.

The scale is composed of three, ten-point Likert-type statements that are intended to measure the strength of the relationship a consumer has with a brand.

Three, five-point items are used to measure a consumer's belief of how well a brand or product category is thought to achieve certain goals. The scale was called ideals at the category level by Martin and Stewart (2001) and ideal attributes by Martin, Stewart, and Matta (2005).

The five item, seven-point Likert-type scale assesses the degree to which a customer relates with a brand/company and believes its image fits well with his/her own self-concept. Aaker, Fournier, and Brasel (2004) referred to the scale as self-connection.

Three statements are used to measure a person's attitude regarding the degree to which something real looks like what it was imagined it would be based upon its depiction in a fictional narrative.

The scale is composed of three statements attempting to assess a consumer's belief of how well a brand can achieve a certain goal. The scale was called goodness-of-fit by Martin and Stewart (2001; Martin, Stewart, and Matta 2005).