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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

attractiveness

How likeable and aesthetically pleasing an object appears to be is measured with three, nine-point semantic differentials.  The items might be used with non-visual objects, such as with sounds, but they seem most appropriate for use when the objects are being rated visually.

The degree of importance a person places on being skinny and attractive is measured with three, seven-point items.

With three, nine-point items, the scale measures how attractive and desirable a person is with whom one has romantic feelings that have not been expressed.

The rivalry with same-sex others over access to mates is measured with seven, seven-point Likert-type items.

In this scale, four, seven-point semantic differentials evaluate how positive or negative a person’s attitude is toward a brand name.  A three-item version is also described.

Three semantic differentials are used to measure how valuable a particular object is considered to be.  Unlike most other measures of value, this one does not explicitly measure the object’s economic value and has more to do with the object’s subjective value based on its desirability.

The scale has five semantic differentials that measure how attractive and appealing a product appears to be.  Although the scale was made for use with a product, it seems to be amenable for use with a wide variety of objects.

The scale uses three, ten-point questions to measure the degree to which a person thought about how he/she looked compared to a particular person with whom he/she interacted. 

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a particular advertisement is visually appealing.

The scale is composed of five, six-point items that measure one’s expectation that if he/she were able to purchase a certain product then it would have a positive impact on one’s life in terms of confidence, status, and image.