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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

attributions

Three, ten-point Likert-type items are used to measure how much a person who has observed a problem situation believes a particular person is responsible for it.  The respondent is the observer of the problem and is not otherwise involved in the problem that occurred.

Five, seven-point items are used to measure how much a business organization is believed to help others with their welfare as the goal rather than for the benefits the company can receive in return.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure how much a person believes a particular party is at fault for an offense that occurred.

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person attributes thought and emotion to a logo regarding its helplessness and not being in control.

The degree to which a person believes a particular company engages in social activity and supports causes because of how it (the company) could benefit from the activity is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a logo appears to move as if it is alive.

The general tendency to attribute distinct human mental capacities to nonhumans is measured with 15 questions.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a customer believes a particular service-related problem was the fault of the service provider (internal) rather than someone or something else (external).

A person’s attribution of humanlike qualities to time (free will, emotions, intentions) is measured using six, seven-point items.

How much a person views time in a certain situation as being a beneficial entity or a maleficent force is measured with three, nine-point items.