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Testimonial

Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

authority

Beliefs that companies have more power, authority, and design expertise than consumers as it relates to products are measured with six, nine-point items.

How much a person considers a brand or business name to have characteristics typified by formality and authoritativeness is measured with three, nine-point uni-polar items.

The scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure how much a person believes that employees at lower levels of an organization should not have much power and should follow those at higher levels in order for the organization to be successful.

The belief that one’s parent(s) firmly directed the children while they were growing up and expected unquestioning obedience is measured with ten Likert items.

The importance a person places on hard work to attain financial rewards and social power is measured with five, eight-point items.

The degree to which a person expresses a trait-like need for power and the tendency to be controlling in social relationships is measured with six, seven-point items.

The degree to which a person believes in the inequality between those people with more power and those people with less.  Four, five-point Likert-type items compose the scale.

The acceptable level of power disparity among people in a society is measured in this scale with eight, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale does not measure a person's power nor the power inequality of a culture per se but rather a person's attitude about power disparity.

This scale has four, seven-point Likert-type items that are intended to measure the degree to which a person accepts differences in the power wielded by various members in a social group.

The scale uses four, nine-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a person views power usage in social relationships to be hierarchic rather than egalitarian.