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Scale Reviews

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Testimonial

Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

behavioral

The scale uses Likert-type items to measure how much a person believes that he/she would not patronize (shop, return to, use) an establishment again in the future and, instead, go to a different one.  Two- and three-item versions are described.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items measure a consumer’s commitment to buy a particular brand in the future if it is available. 

The scale measures a customer’s intention to continue purchasing a specified good from the same specified retailer as was purchased from in the past.  Four, seven-point Likert-type items compose the scale.  The sentences are stated hypothetically but can be easily adapted for measuring actual repurchase intentions by replacing the word “would” in each sentence with “will.”

With six, seven-point items, the scale measures the likelihood that a person will download and use a mobile financial app in various ways.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the extent to which a person contacted someone or an organization that has legal expertise and may help with a complaint against a party.  (The party is not explicitly referred to in the scale but a fitting example would be a service provider.)

How much a person expresses willingness and likelihood of recycling is measured with three, seven-point items.

Using three, seven-point items, the scale measures the extent to which a person who has been exposed to information that encouraged recycling thought about how recycled materials can be “transformed” into new products and/or packages.

How much a parent engages in active co-use of the Internet with his/her child in order to guide behavior is measured using six, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale measures how much a person expresses attitudes and engages in a wide variety of behaviors that indicate his/her dependence upon and possible “addiction” to the use of a mobile phone.  The measure has twenty, ten-point items.

The degree to which a person focused his/her attention on something specific (stated in the items) is measured with three questions and a ten-point response scale.