You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

This website has truly been a welcome gift! The Day Pass is extremely affordable & the site is so user friendly to navigate. It provides a wealth of information including, the source, validity, & references for my doctorate research project. I highly recommend this to anyone as it is truly an invaluable research tool!
Suzanne Cromlish, PhD
Saint Xavier University, Chicago

behavioral

A seven-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person reports him/herself to like shopping around and gathering product information even if not immediately needing to buy anything. Raju (1980) referred to the measure as exploration through shopping.

Four, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure store-related attitudes with an emphasis on the stated tendency to limit shopping to a few stores with which the respondent is familiar.

An 11-item, five-point scale is used in measuring adolescents' expectations about their consumer roles once they start to work and raise a family. The role reflects things "good" consumers are supposed to do or not do.

This is a seven-item, six-point, Likert-type scale that measures a person's interest in shopping at home by phone or mail.

The scale is supposed to assess the extent to which a person consults a variety of sources before making purchase decisions. Moschis (1978, 1981) referred to this as information seeking. Given the nature of one of the information sources (one or both of my parents), the scale is intended for children who are probably still living at home.

Seven, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the amount of money, time, and/ or effort a consumer perceives that a car dealer invested in a transaction.

This seven-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person reports being loyal to what he or she has been using rather than trying something new and/or different. To be clear, it is the tendency be loyal within product categories that is being measured. Raju (1980) referred to the scale as repetitive behavior proneness.

This is a three-item, six-point, Likert-type scale that measures the degree to which a consumer's sense of energy conservation has influenced his/her lifestyle.

A four-item, Likert-type scale is used to measure a person's willingness to follow a physician's advice.

This is a two-item, six-point Likert-type scale that measures the strength of one's motivation to stay at home rather than go out. The scale was referred to as limited activity by Rahtz, Sirgy, and Meadow (1989).