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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensable in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

benefits

The scale uses five, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a consumer thinks about a particular subscription in terms of using it and benefiting from it generally over time.  (This contrasts with thinking about it in terms of distinct times it would be used.)

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how much a consumer thinks about a particular subscription in terms of the distinct times in which the product is used and the benefits received.  (This scale is distinct from measuring a person's thinking generally about using a product over time.)

How much a consumer believes a particular subscription contract would be very beneficial to him/her is measured using four, seven-point Likert-type items.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used in this scale to measure a person’s judgement of whether an advertisement emphasized benefits gained by the person taking an action or the losses and costs if the action was not taken. 

How much a person believes that, in general, companies should be engaged in philanthropic activities and that such behavior is beneficial to them is measured with four, seven-point semantic differentials.

The degree to which a consumer experiences satisfaction in buying products from a company because of its support of “good” causes is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.  Due to the phrasing of one of the items, the scale may make most sense when the company being evaluated is a retailer.

The scale measures a customer’s belief that the relationship he/she has with a service firm is based on the long-term, reciprocal contributions of both parties and benefits to those parties.  Five, seven-point Likert-type items compose the measure.

The extent to which a person believes there are benefits to a particular company having and using his/her personal data is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a customer’s belief that a particular deal he/she has negotiated with a business provides equal benefits for both parties.

The scale has eight, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person believes, in general, that stress can enhance rather than debilitate his/her learning and productivity.