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change

The belief that people have health conditions which they can not change is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items. 

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the belief that all people have the capacity to substantially change their basic health conditions. 

Using three, seven-point items, the scale measures the extent to which a person who has been exposed to information that encouraged recycling thought about how recycled materials can be “transformed” into new products and/or packages.

The scale uses three, seven-point items to measure a person’s preference for normality and routine in his/her life rather than change.

The degree to which a person feels uneasy when society appears to be changing rapidly is measured with three, seven-point items.

This scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a person’s belief that he/she has the capability to create a new life and pursue new goals.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s attitude about the radical change a particular organization is about to make regarding what it stands for.  As currently phrased and scored, the items indicate the respondent is against the repositioning.  Also, the scale instructions frame the situation as hypothetical but minor changes could make the scale amenable for use with a real event.

How much change a person believes there to be in the market for a particular product category in terms of the products available, the promotion conducted, and consumer preferences is measured using four, seven-point items.

Six, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person’s desire to experience consistency and stability at the current time rather than change.

The extent to which a person believes in one’s ability to change the self is measured with four, six-point Likert-type items.