You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

This website has truly been a welcome gift! The Day Pass is extremely affordable & the site is so user friendly to navigate. It provides a wealth of information including, the source, validity, & references for my doctorate research project. I highly recommend this to anyone as it is truly an invaluable research tool!
Suzanne Cromlish, PhD
Saint Xavier University, Chicago

comfortable

The scale uses five, seven-point items to measure how much a person believes a particular object provides him/her with a sense of comfort and security.  Given the phrasing of these sentences, the object should be something that can be held and used for some purpose.

The scale has seven-point Likert-like items that measure how calm and relaxed a person feels at a particular point in time.  A five-item version as well as a six-item version are described.

This seven-point scale measures how much a consumer believes one smartphone is similar to another phone on four characteristics related to ease of use.

The pleasantness and ease felt when performing an activity is measured with four, seven-point semantic-differentials.  The scale is particularly appropriate when the context involves real or imagined haptic cues.

Four, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure the degree to which an object has a texture that feels comfortable and gentle against the skin.

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how much a person believes a particular object has a fine texture and feels plush.

The scale measures a person’s anxiety that is based on some sort of a physical restriction being experienced.  Two versions of the scale are described that are slightly different in the number of items and the response scales used with them.

Six, eleven-point unit-polar items are used to measure how soft and pleasing an object is judged to be.  The scale appears to most useful when measuring a sensation associated with the sense of touch.  

Five Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person experiences a feeling of well-being with respect to a particular choice he/she has made.  Two slightly different versions of the scale are provided: one that allows for comparison of two decision options and another version that focuses on just one option.

How a person feels (affectively) about his/her financial status is measured with four, nine-point semantic differentials.