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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

company

Beliefs that companies have more power, authority, and design expertise than consumers as it relates to products are measured with six, nine-point items.

How much a person believes that a company has the capability and resources to do public good is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The extent to which a person believes that a company is demonstrating its commitment to doing public good is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a particular company makes a customer feel like he/she has some influence on it.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how much a person feels close and connected to a particular company.

The scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure how much a person believes that employees at lower levels of an organization should not have much power and should follow those at higher levels in order for the organization to be successful.

This measure uses six, nine-point items to assess the extent to which a person believes that a company or set of companies have leadership in the marketplace and can influence suppliers, competitors, and consumers.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure how much a person believes that a particular donation made by a company was helpful and instrumental.  The name of the organization, cause, or person to which the donation was made can be specified in the sentences.

The extent to which an entity (company, organization, person, etc.) is viewed as compassionate and moral or, at the other extreme, cruel and harmful is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.

Using nine-point unipolar items, the scale measures the degree to which a company is considered to be organized, effective, and decisive in its interactions with customers.  Two versions of the scale are described: one with three items and another with nine.