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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

comparison

The extent of similarity a person believes there to be between him/herself and someone else in terms of cognitive and physical characteristics is measured with four, seven-point items.    

This seven-point scale measures how much a consumer believes one smartphone is similar to another phone on four characteristics related to ease of use.

The belief that someone put more thought and time into writing a review than the average reviewer is measured with six items.  The object of the review is not stated in the sentences but can be put in the instructions if not obvious from other aspects of the experiment or questionnaire.

The extent to which a person believes another individual is a peer and thinks like him/her is measured with three, 101-point items.

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person believes that a particular good or service is new to the market and different from alternative products.

Four, seven-point semantic differentials measure the degree to which a person feels dissatisfied with his/her financial situation, especially when compared to the situations experienced by peers.

How much a person is interested in direct banking and is diligent in selecting one is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

How a person believes his/her capability and confidence compare to other people investing in the stock market is measured with three, seven-point items.

Four, seven-point items measure how much a person believes that a branded product gives owners a feeling of superiority and higher status compared to other customers who do have the product.

The extent to which a consumer wants to be a special user of a brand with a higher status than other users is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.