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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
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Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

complaining

The likelihood of a customer complaining and seeking redress from a service provider when he/she has had a dissatisfactory service experience is measured with seven, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale is “general” in the sense that the sentences do not refer to a particular experience but rather the typical inclination when one has had a dissatisfactory encounter.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the extent to which a customer wants to express his/her frustration and feelings about a particular company.

How much a customer avoids telling companies and brands what they are doing wrong is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the extent to which a person contacted someone or an organization that has legal expertise and may help with a complaint against a party.  (The party is not explicitly referred to in the scale but a fitting example would be a service provider.)

Using five semantic differentials, the scale measures the degree of aggravation and damage a customer intends to cause for a company.  The scale stem implies that the person is taking punitive action because of something the company has done.

With four, seven-point items, the scale measures a person’s stated likelihood of challenging an action taken by an organization that he/she disputes and even escalating the issue if necessary.

Using three, seven-point items, the scale measures the degree to which a person is inclined to complain about a specified entity to other people.  As currently phrased, the scale makes the most sense for use with a hypothetical scenario rather than as feedback about an actual event that has already occurred.

The extent to which a customer complained to friends, family, and others about a particular shopping experience is measured with three, five-point Likert-type items.

The subjective probability that a person will tell others about something is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.  The measure is “general” both in terms of what is being talked about as well as the favorability of the responder’s opinion (positive vs. negative).

A person’s intentions to not only complain directly to the company but also to news media and multiple levels of government is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.