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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

compliance

The degree to which a person featured in an advertisement behaves in a way that is consistent with the social norms of the country in which the ad is run is measured with four items.

The degree to which a person believes there are clear social norms that people should comply with in his/her country is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how much a person believes there are clear social norms and that he/she should comply with them.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how much time and effort a person must expend in order to follow the advice given to him/her by a professional in order to achieve the desired outcome.

The extent to which an object is considered to be powerful and aggressive is measured with three, seven-point items.

Four statements are used to measure the extent to which a customer in a retail establishment near the time it is set to close courteously interacted with employees as they engaged in behaviors related to closing the store.

One's feeling that someone (unnamed) was trying to influence his/her evaluation in a particular situation is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  To be clear, it is not just that the person feels that there was an attempt to influence him/her but that there was pressure to give a certain evaluation.

This scale used three Likert-type items to measure a customer's understanding and willingness to cooperate with changes or requests made by an organization.

This four-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used for measuring the belief that if a new product were purchased it would be noticed by a reference group important to the consumer.

The scale is composed of five, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure the degree to which a person believes that a certain product is "public" in the sense that if he/she were to purchase and use it others would be aware of it. DelVecchio and Smith (2005) referred to the scale as social risk - evaluation by others.