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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

computers

With three, 100-point items, the scale measures how much a person is troubled by algorithms that can perform a particular task better than humans.  The actual task is not stated in the sentences and, whatever it is should be made clear to participants prior to filling out the scale.

Three, 100-point items measure the degree to which a person believes that a particular task is not just accomplished well by algorithms, but performs better than humans.  The actual task is not stated in the sentences and, whatever it is should be made clear to participants prior to filling out the scale.

A three-item, seven-point scale is used to assess the ease of using a computer to perform some task that a person reports experiencing.

This scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree of control a person reports having over his/her interaction with a particular website. The scale was referred to as the control subfactor of a second-order construct that Wang et al. (2007) called flow. While this factor and the others measured by Wang et al. (2007) might as a set be viewed as composing flow, they do not individually appear to measure flow, thus, are not referred to here as such.

The scale measures the degree to which a person believes that a website enables the user to know where he/she is, go where he/she wants to go, and do what he/she wants to accomplish at the site.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure the degree to which a person desires software that would help him/her protect his/her personal information and online behavior by doing such things as eliminating cookies, disguising identity, and preventing e-mail tracking.

The scale is composed of five, five-point Likert-type statements that measure how essential a consumer believes a computer to be in his/her home.

Five, five-point Likert-type statements are used to assess the degree to which a consumer believes that a computer has changed key aspects of his/her life, particularly in the home.

The scale is composed of three statements that are intended to measure a person's belief that a particular website is free from technical glitches as far as the customer's experience is concerned such as busy server messages or crashing.

The eight, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to measure a person's dislike of computers as well as their discomfort using them.