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The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

consistency

The degree to which an object or event is considered to be consistent and stable at one extreme or erratic and risky at the other is measured with ten, seven-point bi-polar adjectives.

The scale uses four Likert-type items to measure the extent to which a consumer believes there is a uniform design of the brand across multiple touchpoints. 

The scale uses four, five-point items to measure the degree to which an adolescent thinks his/her parents are inconsistent in their restriction of the time he/she can spend with television, movies, and video games that contained too much violence.

The scale uses three, seven-point semantic differentials to measure how well two objects are considered to fit each other and be compatible.

Six, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person’s desire to experience consistency and stability at the current time rather than change.

Employing four statements, the scale measures the degree to which a customer believes that each part (employee, department, partner) of a particular service provider works “in concert” and as one to smoothly provide service to him/her.

With four items, this scale measures how similar a brand extension is to its parent brand and the appropriateness of launching it.

Using three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a brand extension is similar to its parent brand in satisfying the same needs, being used in the same situations, and have common physical features.

The scale has three, five-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a brand extension is consistent with its parent brand, particularly in terms of image.

Using three statements, the scale measures a consumer's belief that the look and feel of shopping-related websites affect the sense of their quality.  As currently phrased, the items are not specific to a particular website but rather to shopping sites in general.