You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

convenience

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure how much of a problem a customer believes a particular service failure is, was, or could be.

Composed of three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a consumer believes that a particular website, most likely an online retailer, provides ways for customers to reach them and even speak with a live representative if desired.

The scale has three, five-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a consumer believes that using a particular good or service would be easier and allow greater flexibility than the currently used product.

The three-item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures a consumer’s attitude regarding the ease and speed with which he/she is able to purchase products at a particular retailer.  The scale is general in the sense that the statements are amenable for use with either physical stores or those online.

A consumer’s attitude about how quickly and easily he/she is able to find and select products from an assortment provided by a particular retailer is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

With five short phrases and a seven-point Likert-type response format, the scale measures the extent to which a customer believes a store where an order was placed appears to be convenient to use based on such things as low time and effort ordering costs. 

The scale has four, seven-point items that measure the degree to which a person believes that an e-mail message he/she received from a company is relevant and a convenient source of information.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a consumer's beliefs about the degree to which a store has positive attributes such as product variety, fair prices, and good service.

The ease with which a consumer is able to find where to purchase so-called "green products" is measured using five, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a person views a food as being visible, desirable, and easy to access at a particular point in time is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.