You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

This website has truly been a welcome gift! The Day Pass is extremely affordable & the site is so user friendly to navigate. It provides a wealth of information including, the source, validity, & references for my doctorate research project. I highly recommend this to anyone as it is truly an invaluable research tool!
Suzanne Cromlish, PhD
Saint Xavier University, Chicago

cost

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which the monetary cost of a subscription contract is considered to be small.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a particular company spends a lot of money on “socially responsible” activities.

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a particular company spends money on “social responsibility” activities in order to improve its own reputation.

The degree to which a person believes there is a relationship between the healthiness of food and its cost such that healthier foods tend to be more expensive than unhealthy foods is measured with three, seven-point items.

With four, seven-point items, the scale measures a person’s stated likelihood of challenging an action taken by an organization that he/she disputes and even escalating the issue if necessary.

Using three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures some cost-related reasons a consumer has for not installing a particular energy-saving device.

With five short phrases and a seven-point Likert-type response format, the scale measures the extent to which a customer believes a store where an order was placed appears to be convenient to use based on such things as low time and effort ordering costs. 

Composed of four, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the extent to which a consumer believes he/she has received certain benefits from a provider over time and would lose them if changing providers.

Using five, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the extent to which a consumer believes he/she has spent a lot of time and effort on a relationship with a current provider.

The scale has four, five-point Likert-type items and measures how much a consumer believes that if he/she were to change service providers then new policies would have to be learned.