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Thirteen items are used to measure the level of objective knowledge a person has of basic financial concepts.  An eight-item version is also discussed.

The scale has five, six-point items that measure how quickly and easily a person believes he/she could repay money taken from personal savings or charged to a credit card if it was used to pay for an emergency.

A person's knowledge of various typical consumer financial products is measured by asking ten questions.  It is considered an objective measure rather than a subjective one because each question has a correct answer rather than being a person's opinion of his/her knowledge level.

The scale measures a person's attitude about programs that combine multiple debt repayment obligations into one loan. 

The importance of issues other than interest rates in a person's decision to get a debt consolidation loan is measured in the scale with four, five-point Likert-like items.

The scale measures how likely a person thinks it is that he/she will engage in activities that are part of responsible handling of personal financial matters related to loans, debts, and credit usage.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person expresses positive beliefs regarding a particular credit card. In particular, Woo, Fock, and Hui (2006) used the scale to measure beliefs regarding the affinity credit card for a university and, thus, referred to it as affinity card beliefs.

Seven, seven-point Likert type items are used to measure whether a person's expressed credit card behavior is to use them routinely for their credit-related benefits or, instead, to use them more out of convenience (by always paying each month the total of what is owed).

The likelihood that a certain credit card would have particular benefits is measured in this scale using five, seven-point items.

The scale is composed of four statements used to measure the importance placed by a consumer on certain aspects of the purchase process focusing on how to make the purchase.  As used by Agee and Martin (2001), the scale was used with an infomercial and the importance of providing information about the means of paying for the product.