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Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

deals

The degree to which a customer is pleased with the reduction in price that he/she was able to negotiate during a recent purchase is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale measures the degree to which a consumer anticipates feeling wrong if he/she does not purchase a product that is linked in some way to helping a particular charity.  Three, eleven-point Likert-type items compose the scale.

A seven-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the concern a consumer has for paying low prices contingent on some product quality expectations.

Three statements are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person believes that a certain store uses a form of sales promotion that is insincere and that misleads customers.

This five-item, seven-point Likert-type measure assesses a consumer's reported adeptness at and enjoyment of bargaining.

This is a three-item, seven-point Likert-type scale that assesses the degree to which a consumer believes that a sale price is a true decrease in the normal price of a product rather than being the price typically charged by a retailer. The scale was referred to by Lichtenstein, Burton, and Karson (1991) as cue consistency.

The scale is composed of four statements with a seven-point Likert-type response format which are intended to measure the degree to which a person is certain that the price stated in an advertisement for a product at a certain store is the lowest one available.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the extent to which a consumer eagerly seeks lower than expected prices for products, feels good when they are found, and feels bad when they are not. The scale was called transaction utility by Völckner (2008).

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure a consumer's attitude toward the price of a product with an emphasis on the extent to which it is viewed as a good deal.

A consumer's attitude about a particular price-deal he/she has been exposed to is measured with Likert-type measures in this scale.