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death

A person’s belief that his/her identity will extend beyond death and, in particular, be remembered “in the community” is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has eight items that measure how much a person is bothered by things related to death and disconnected body parts.  (Most of the items have some connection to death and all but one of the items refer to human bodies or parts.) 

With six, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the level of emotional discomfort that was experienced when a stimulus evoked thoughts about one’s morality.

Three, seven-point items compose the scale and measure how much a person believes a particular treatment would prevent serious health consequences, including a life-threatening condition.

The scale is composed of six, seven-point Likert-type statements that are intended to measure the degree to which a person thinks about and is disturbed by thoughts regarding his/her death.  The scale was called existential insecurity by Rindfleisch, Burroughs, and Wong (2009) and fear of one's own death by the originator (Wittkowski 2001).

The scale is composed of 18 questions that are purported to measure a person's sense of the incidence of crime in the country with particular emphasis on New York City.