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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

decision-making

A person’s confidence in his/her ability to make good decisions is measured with six, five-point items.

Six items are used to measure the belief that a particular salesperson engaged in questioning and answering in an attempt to convince one that he/she (the consumer) would benefit from a suggested product solution.

Using six items, the scale measures the belief that a particular salesperson with whom a consumer interacted used compliance tactics based on immediate, superficial factors (threats and promises) not directly related to the product itself.

Three, ten-point items measure how much a consumer wants more detailed information about something because of the information’s usefulness.

Five, five-point items measure a person’s belief that, with respect to heterosexual couples, one gender tends to dominate food-related decisions while the other is more dependent.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the extent to which a person actively participated in a particular decision-making process with another person and, afterward, felt accountable for the decision that was made.

How much a person prefers not to make decisions related to a certain domain is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items. 

With four items, the scale measures the extent to which a person believes that his/her decisions involving a particular domain of information are made well and easy to make. 

The extent to which a person believes he/she has what it takes to make wise financial decisions, especially with respect to investments, is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items. 

Five, seven-point items are used to measure whether information about the stock level or the sales level of two comparable products is the better indicator for making a purchase decision.