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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

decision-making

Three, seven-point items measure how much a person cares about a particular decision and is involved in it.  As phrased, the decision is in the future.  The items can be easily adapted for reference to a decision that has already been made.

A person’s confidence in his/her ability to make good decisions is measured with six, five-point items.

A person’s feeling of freedom to decide how to respond to a donation request is measured with four, six-point items.

Six items are used to measure the belief that a particular salesperson engaged in questioning and answering in an attempt to convince one that he/she (the consumer) would benefit from a suggested product solution.

Using six items, the scale measures the belief that a particular salesperson with whom a consumer interacted used compliance tactics based on immediate, superficial factors (threats and promises) not directly related to the product itself.

Three, ten-point items measure how much a consumer wants more detailed information about something because of the information’s usefulness.

Five, five-point items measure a person’s belief that, with respect to heterosexual couples, one gender tends to dominate food-related decisions while the other is more dependent.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the extent to which a person actively participated in a particular decision-making process with another person and, afterward, felt accountable for the decision that was made.

How much a person prefers not to make decisions related to a certain domain is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items. 

With four items, the scale measures the extent to which a person believes that his/her decisions involving a particular domain of information are made well and easy to make.