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Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

differentiation

The scale is composed of three, nine-point semantic differentials and measures the extent to which a person believes there are differences among some specified set stimuli. As used by Gürhan-Canli (2003), the stimuli were different products within the same brand family and the perceived difference in quality among those products was being examined.

The scale is composed of three, nine-point semantic differentials and measures the degree to which a person believes some features are shared by a specific set of objects or are generally shared among a wider set of objects. 

The four, five-point Likert-type statements measure the degree to which a person believes the services provided by competing providers in an industry vary a lot in their quality. If reversed from the way the items are shown being scored (below), the scale could be considered a measure of parity.

The scale is composed of eight Likert-type statements measuring the degree to which a person expresses the motivation to consume unique consumer products that few others possess. The scale was called desire for unique consumer products (DUCP) by Lynn and Harris (1997).

The extent to which a person expresses the motivation to be different from other people is measured in this scale with 32 Likert-type statements.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure the degree to which a person believes that for a certain product category, different brands are easy to distinguish, primarily due to the conspicuousness of their brand names. DelVecchio and Smith (2005) referred to the scale as social risk - brand prominence.

The degree of similarity a consumer believes there to be between two brands based on image and features is measured using five, nine-point statements.

Four bi-polar adjectives are used to measure the degree to which a person perceives a stimulus to have a quality characteristic of a broader class of stimuli rather than one particular stimulus. Aggarwal and Law (2005) used the scale as a manipulation check to make sure two scenarios were similar in their levels of abstraction.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type statements measuring the degree to which a consumer believes that, based on the advertising he/she has been exposed to, a specific brand of a product is distinct from the competition.

This three-item, seven-point scale is used to measure how new and different a product is compared to current products the consumer is aware of and the perceived impact it would have on the consumer's behavior.