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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

differentiation

Thirty-one, five-point, Likert-type statements are used to assess a trait having to do with a consumer's motivation to purchase and own products that help provide a sense of distinctiveness from other people. The construct can be viewed as a desire for counterconformity for the purpose of enhancing one's personal and social identity. Visual communication of uniqueness is stressed in the scale rather than verbal.

Four, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to assess a consumer's opinion regarding the extent to which all brands in a specified product category are of similar quality and there are no meaningful differences. The scale was referred to by Batra and Sinha (2000) as degree of quality variation in category.

The three-item, Likert-type scale measures the degree to which a subject perceives two or more ads to be of different size.

This is a two-item, seven-point scale measuring the degree to which a consumer perceives a product category to have many different brands composing it. Sujan and Bettman (1989) referred to this scale as product category submarkets and used it for 35mm SLR cameras.

This two item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a consumer perceives a certain brand to be in a class apart from other brands of a specified product category. Sujan and Bettman (1989) referred to this scale as brand subtyping and used it for 35mm SLR cameras.

Four statements are used to measure the situation-specific (not enduring) relevance of an object to a person. The object in the Slama and Tashchian (1987) study was shampoo. Stapel, Likert, and semantic differential versions of the scale were developed and tested.

This is a four-item, seven-point semantic differential scale measuring the degree to which a consumer perceives a certain brand to be like other brands typical of a specified product category. Sujan and Bettman (1989) used it for 35mm SLR cameras.