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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensable in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

discomfort

How much a person expresses an inability to continue his/her life and be happy if certain disturbing thoughts or feelings are experienced.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person experiences a psychological void and hollowness most likely because one’s life does not seem to have meaning or belongingness.

How confined and stuffy a space feels to a person is measured with five, seven-point items. 

How much a person experiences physical discomfort in three specified parts of the body at a point in time is measured with a seven-point response format.

Seven, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a person believes his/her language skills were the reason why he/her was treated unjustly by someone else.

The scale has eight items that measure how much a person is bothered by things related to death and disconnected body parts.  (Most of the items have some connection to death and all but one of the items refer to human bodies or parts.) 

The scale measures how much a consumer believes that it is awkward and uncomfortable to purchase a particular product when the behavior can be observed by others.  Based on the items, some of the embarrassment comes from the product itself while some is due to other people witnessing the purchase.  A five- and an eight-item version are described.

The scale measures a person’s anxiety that is based on some sort of a physical restriction being experienced.  Two versions of the scale are described that are slightly different in the number of items and the response scales used with them.

Five, eleven-point items are used to measure how much a person felt a sense of “going against the flow” by doing something different and experiencing resistance against someone or something in a particular situation.  

Composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person believes that there were too many customers in a store.