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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

dominance

The extent to which a person feels a sense of personal control in a particular situation is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The extent to which an object is considered to be powerful and aggressive is measured with three, seven-point items.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials compose the scale and measure the extent to which a person feels strong and in-control at a particular point in time.  To be clear, this scale was created to measure a person’s state rather than a personality trait or enduring characteristic. 

Using three questions, this scale measures how much a person believes that at a particular point in time he/she had power over other people.

The degree to which a consumer feels in control of a brand is measured with three, seven-point items.

The degree to which a person expresses a trait-like need for power and the tendency to be controlling in social relationships is measured with six, seven-point items.

The degree to which a person believes him/herself to be in control and able to get his/her way is measured with five, ten-point Likert-type items.  The statements themselves are rather general and do not explicitly measure power as a trait or as a state.  Instructions used with the statements can help focus participants’ attention on one versus the other type of powerfulness.

The degree to which one person views another person as being competent due his/her assertiveness and apparent status is measured with four, seven-point semantic differentials.

A person’s opinion of the self-confidence and assertiveness of another person is measure in this scale using three, seven-point items.

How much a person feels overwhelmed and lacking control within a particular environment is measured with five, seven-point items.