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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

eating

Three, seven-point semantic differential items measure the degree to which a person believes a particular food is an important part of a healthy diet.

Three items are used to measure how much a person is concerned about his/her body weight and, because of that, diets frequently.

How much a person describes his/herself as being careful to eat in a nutritious manner is measured with three, eleven-point items.

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures how appetizing and satisfying a person considers a food or beverage to have been that was tasted.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a person’s attitude about some produce (vegetables and/or fruit) in a particular context is harmful to eat and could make him/her sick.

How much a person anticipates that if a particular meal is eaten then he/she would feel bad and sorry about it afterwards.  A three- and a four-item version are discussed.  Each item has its own unique semantic differential and a 101-point sliding scale.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure how much a person still wants to eat a familiar brand of a product immediately after having tried some of an unknown brand. 

The scale has ten items that measure a person’s desire to eat in response to “external” stimuli (non-hunger related), with an emphasis on exposure to the sights and smells of food.

The belief that a particular portion of food is sufficient for satisfying one’s appetite in a particular context or for part of a meal is measured with three, nine-point items.

The scale uses three, nine-point items to measure a person’s belief that a particular portion of food is a sufficient quantity for enjoying the taste of a specified food.